THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN BOTANICAL PERFUME OIL

The origin of / Indian botanical perfume oil /The essence of ITTR à GOGO

The logo / TTTR / is inspired by Hindi script “devanagari” the alphabet used for Sanskrit, Hindi, and other Indian languages. It is written from left to right, has a strong preference for symmetrical rounded shapes within squared outlines, and is recognisable by a horizontal line that runs along the top of full letters. The dot on top of the first [T] indicates the letter [i], pronunciation of the logo is ittr.

The word / ittr / ittar, attar, atr or othr comes from the Persian word itir meaning fragrance, scent or essence. Ittr is a highly concentrated perfume oil created from botanical sources, free from alcohol and chemicals. The fragrant ingredients are distilled either by steam or hydro distillation into a sandalwood oil base and then aged. The aging period can last from one to ten years depending on the botanicals used and the results desired. Because of its concentrated form, ittr is sold in tiny bottles. It has a permanent shelf life and some ittr’s will become syrupy and smell more intense when matured.

TALE NO.1 / harshacharita / (7th century AD) Kannauj India | The earliest distillation of fragrant oil was mentioned in the Harshacharita a biography of the Indian Maharaja Harsha. The Ayurvedic text Charaka Samhita mentions the use of fragrant agarwood oil. India is known to pioneer the art of making perfumes from natural fragrant substances. Archaeological testaments shows that the earliest inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent held plants in great respect. With the passage of time, perfume was prepared by placing precious flowers and sacred plants into a water or vegetable oil. Slowly the plants and flowers would infuse the oil with their significant fragrance. The ingredients would then be removed and the richness of their aromatic scent would be held in this sacred elixir.

TALE NO.2 / empress nur jahan / (1577-1645) Red fort Palace, Agra India | Empress Nur Jahan was the 20th wife of Mogul Emperor Jahangir. She was the most powerful and influential woman at court during a period when the Mughal Empire was at the peak of its power and glory. One ancient story illustrates that in the aftermath of a conflict between her and Jahangir, Nur decided to please the king by giving him a large banquet. She filled all the reservoirs inside the palace and gardens with roses and restricted anyone from washing hands in them. During the day the sun broke down the elements, next day morning she noticed a layer of film on the surface. Nur thought that someone had thrown fat into the reservoirs, and had the oil tested. Finding that it smelled very sweet and that it must have come directly from the rose petals, she applied this substance on the palm of her hand and realized that it was far more effective than mere rosewater. Ever since Nur Jahan is associated with the discovery of ittr.

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